The field research under the AgriDiet project was completed in September 2015. The analysis is ongoing and the research findings will continue to be added to this site.

The AgriDiet site will also continue to provide updates on the latest research findings relating to agriculture and nutrition in Ethiopia and Tanzania via ELDIS

  • Welcome to AgriDiet

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    AgriDiet is a a research partnership between eight universities and research centres in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Ethiopia and Tanzania, led by University College Cork.

    The aim is to understand how agriculture impacts on the nutritional status of rural households and to identify policies, practices and interventions that can make a positive impact on nutritional status.

    On this website you will find information about the 9 work package components of the project, plus regular updates from the project team in our news section and the latest outputs in our project reports section. You can also register to receive the project’s quarterly newsletter and browse our resource centre of relevant research on agriculture and nutrition.

    We are currently in the early stages of the 3 year project, having held initial stakeholder workshops earlier in the year. We have also recently released a final draft paper reviewing agriculture-nutrition linkages, led by our IDS partner, and a revised version of our Methodology Guidelines and Conceptual Framework, led by the UCC team.

    We would be interested to hear your thoughts on our project and to link with stakeholders and others involved in similar research

     


  • Welcome to AgriDiet

      AgriDiet is a a research partnership between eight universities and research centres in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Ethiopia and Tanzania, led by University College Cork. The aim is to understand how agriculture impacts on the nutritional status of rural households and to identify policies, practices and interventions that can make a positive impact on […]

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  • Understanding, enabling and building effective leadership in nutrition

    Transform Nutrition’s work on leaders in nutrition explores how effective leaders understand the systems which both shape and constrain their action; and are able to translate this understanding into action which spans the boundaries of sectors and disciplinary knowledge.
     
    Researchers within the Transform Nutrition consortium carried out a study of 89 individuals or representatives of organisations who had been identified as national level leaders within the field of nutrition in four countries: India, Bangladesh, Kenya and Ethiopia. Leaders here came from diverse backgrounds but were able to adapt strategically to the political landscape; spanning boundaries between sectors and disciplines and bring others along as their understanding of nutrition’smulti-sectoral nature developed.
     
    As what leaders do is more important that who leaders are, the researchers suggest a number of way in which leadership can be supported and built. A more structured effort is called for to build a cadre of leaders up to the challenge of working effectively to tackle undernutrition as a pressing global...

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  • Accounting for nutritional changes in six success stories: a regression-decomposition approach

    Over the past two decades, many developing countries have made impressive progress in reducing undernutrition. In this paper, the authors explore potential explanations of this success by applying consistent statistical methods to multiple rounds of Demographic Health Surveys for Bangladesh, Nepal, Ethiopia, Odisha, Senegal, and Zambia.

    The research finds that changes in household wealth, mother's education and access to antenatal care are the largest drivers of nutritional improvement, except for Zambia where large increases in bednet usage is the single largest factor. Other factors play a smaller role in explaining nutritional improvements with improvements in sanitation only appearing to be important in South Asia. Overall, the results point to the need for multidimensional nutritional strategies involving a broad range of nutrition-sensitive sectors.

    Hightlights:

    • asset accumulation and parental education are important predictor of nutritional improvement in most countries

    • improved sanitation is more strongly associated with height-for-age in South Asian countries

    • asset accumulation and parental education are important predictor of nutritional improvement in most countries

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  • Equate and conflate: political commitment to hunger and undernutrition reduction in five high-burden countries

    As political commitment is an essential ingredient for elevating food and nutrition security onto policy agendas, commitment metrics have proliferated. Many conflate government commitment to fight hunger with combating undernutrition. Here the authors test the hypothesis that commitment to hunger reduction is empirically different from commitment to reducing undernutrition through expert surveys in five high-burden countries: Bangladesh, Malawi, Nepal, Tanzania, and Zambia.

    Findings confirm the hypothesis. The paper concludes that sensitive commitment metrics are needed to guide government and donor policies and programmatic action. Without, historically inadequate prioritisation of non-food aspects of malnutrition may persist to imperil achieving global nutrition targets.

    Hightlights:

    • nine key components of political commitment are identified

    • political commitment to reducing (a) hunger and (b) undernutrition is measured
    • research uses expert perception surveys in Bangladesh, Malawi, Nepal, Tanzania, and Zambia

    • hunger reduction commitment differs from commitment to address undernutrition
    • commitment metrics must be sensitive to these differences to better guide...

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  • Championing nutrition: effective leadership for action

    The calls for strong leadership in the fight against global and national malnutrition have multiplied during the past decade. The role of nutrition champions in advocating for nutrition, formulating policies, and coordinating and implementing action in nutrition have increasingly been recognized in such countries as Peru, Brazil, Thailand, and the Indian states of Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. Global initiatives such as the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement, the African Nutrition Leadership Programme, and the European Nutrition Leadership Platform have invested in building up capacity for leadership among national governments, civil society, and the private sector. The World Public Health Nutrition Association’s guide on competencies needed to build up the workforce in global public health nutrition identified leadership as key. More widely, leadership within the field of public health has been highlighted as key to moving child or maternal health higher up on the global agenda and tackling critical issues such as HIV and AIDS at the national and community levels.

    While evidence within the nutrition and public health arenas points time and again to the role of leadership in successfully crafting nutrition policies and movements, little is actually known about the characteristics of leaders in nutrition: who they are, how they function, with whom they work, and what makes them effective.
     
    This chapter aims to answer some of these questions. It first reviews the literature on leadership within both nutrition and other disciplines. It then draws on interviews conducted with 89 influential decision makers in four countries with high burdens of undernutrition: Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, and Kenya. The chapter also highlights a case study on leadership from Zambia and 10 nutrition champions identified as part of a global selection process run by Transform Nutrition in 2015, in order to conveythe depth and breadth of the experience of these leaders.

    This paper is a chapter in Nourishing millions: Stories of change in nutrition. Gillespie, Stuart; Hodge, Judith; Yosef, Sivan; and Pandya-Lorch, Rajul (Eds.) Ch. 18 Pp. 161-172. Washington, D.C.: International Food Policy Research Institute....

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  • Stories of change in nutrition: an overview

    After a period of relative success in generating political momentum to address malnutrition, there is an increasing urgency to focus on implementation and impact on the ground. This requires better documentation of the experiences of policymakers, nutrition leaders, program managers and implementers in making decisions on what to do in real time, such as coordinating and implementing multisectoral nutrition plans in dynamic country contexts.

    The goal of the Stories of Change (SoC) initiative is to foster and support such experiential learning by systematically assessing and analysing drivers of change in six high-burden contexts (Ethiopia, Zambia, Senegal, Bangladesh, Nepal and Odisha, India) that have had some success in accelerating improvements in nutrition. While recognising context-specificity, here the authors unpack the key pre-requisites (commitment, coherence, accountability, data, leadership, capacity and finance) that fuel and sustain progress.

    Highlights of this research:

    • political commitment is essential, but institutional commitment needed for action
    • leadership is transformational, and pivotal in triggering and sustaining change
    • Policy coherence, accountability, data, capacity and finance are other key...

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